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Solidarity and Sasol left their latest meeting at the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration without achieving any success after the second round of conciliation held at the CCMA did not yield a solution for their ongoing dispute.

Solidarity members at Sasol have been on a go-slow since the beginning of September because of Sasol’s employee ownership plan, Khanyisa, which excludes white workers from its Phase 2.

According to Solidarity Deputy General Secretary Deon Reyneke, Sasol refuses to whatsoever concede to the striking workers’ requests.

“It maintains in no uncertain terms that its division of the workforce on the basis of race is acceptable and constitutes justified discrimination.

The striking workers’ clear request for inclusivity is simply being swept off the table,” Reyneke explained.

Solidarity will now intensify the strike and the creation of awareness about this important issue by declaring a national day of protest by its members and by organising a protest march to the Sasol head office in Sandton.

Solidarity maintains Sasol is on the wrong side of the Mining Charter.

According to the Mining Charter, employees must share in company shareholding and all employees must benefit from employee share ownership plans.

As such, the Mining Charter does not make a distinction between employees based on race.

Arising from the new Mining Charter, Solidarity has requested the company to amend its Khanyisa scheme, a scheme which excludes white employees because of their race. This is according to Solidarity chief executive, Dr Dirk Hermann.

“Being part of the mining industry Sasol has to comply with the Mining Charter. The new Mining Charter is the product of intense negotiation and consultation between government, mining companies, trade unions and the communities which spanned many years and which ultimately led to consensus being reached," comments Hermann.

"If Sasol does not amend its Khanyisa employee share ownership plan, then they are not observing the consensus achieved between parties in the mining industry," he continues.